Getting Back To My Cheese Making Roots with Caerphilly #6

I have made several types of cheese that have been out of my “wheel house” so to speak, I felt that it was time to get back to my cheese making roots so to speak.  It was time to make Caerphilly again.  It did not hurt that I had a request from my mother to make one and have it ready for October, it was the push I needed to make it.  It was time to dust off the my recipe that I created, which I haven’t used since I left Smoky Valley Goat/Artisan Cheese, and get 16 litres of good quality milk and begin.

Time to get things started.

Time to get things started.

My recipe or Caerphilly is based on a few different recipes including one from one of my cheese making heroes Gavin Webber from Little Green Cheese, and it is the basis of Smoky Valley Goat/Artisan Cheese’s Redwater and Callingwood.  That being said it was nice to make it again on a small-scale.  This time I monitored the pH a little more closely than I usually do, and I think it paid off.  I normally go by how the curd feels, but this time I used pH strips to help find the acidity levels too.

Using my little rig to test temperature and flocculation it was time to heat things up.

Using my little rig to test temperature and flocculation it was time to heat things up.

Once the milk reached temperature it was time to add the cultures and ripen for 30-40 minutes, then add the rennet.  I used a flocculation multiplier of 4 and which gave me a 48 minute time until I cut the curd.

You can see where the thermometer sat

You can see where the thermometer sat

lovely curds and whey after cutting.

Lovely curds and whey after cutting.

After cutting I went through the heating up the curds and stirring for 30 minutes.  I also was checking on the pH as well as going for curd feel.  It took 28 minutes to reach temperature and the pH level was almost right and the curd felt right too.  It was time to drain the curd and prep the pot for cheddaring.

The curd draining in a warm cheese cloth for 10 minutes

The curd draining in a warm cheese cloth for 10 minutes

The curd mass went back into the pot and was stacked over and over again.

The curd mass went back into the heated pot and was stacked over and over, draining whey as I went.  Can you guess how I got the whey out?

After an hour and a half it was time to mill the curd

After an hour and a half it was time to mill the curd

This what the cheddared curd looked like before milling

This what the cheddared curd looked like before milling

Now it was time to go into the press for 30 mins at 8kg

After salting the curd, now it was time to go into the press for 30 mins at 8 kg

After a second flip (pressed at 16 kg), I had increased the weigh  to 56 kg and put the press on the floor in my new whey catcher.

After a second flip (pressed at 16 kg), I had increased the weight to 56 kg and put the press on the floor in my new whey catcher.

Then I barricaded it so that my toddler could not accidentally knock it over and hurt herself.

Then I barricaded it so that my toddler could not accidentally knock it over and hurt herself.

The next morning it was time to un mould the cheese

The next morning it was time to un mould the cheese

I did the final press without cheese cloth

I did the last press without cheese cloth

I was generally happy with the rind, I think next time I will try to press in the pot to start.

I was generally happy with the rind, I think next time I will try to press in the pot to start to keep the curds warmer.

1.4 kg of cheese is not bad, it is less then a 10% yield, but that was to be expected.

1.4 kg of cheese is not bad, it is less than a 10% yield, but that was to be expected.

Then it was time to go under the dome to air dry for a few days.

Then it was time to go under the dome to air dry for a few days.

It has been air drying for almost 2 days now and then it will go into the cave until it is ready to try.  I will be opening this cheese the first weekend in October when my family comes up for a visit.  I will keep you updated about how things develop.  The cave will be full now, I think it may be time to expand.

As always I will have more pictures on the Much To Do About Cheese Facebook Page, be sure to check it out as I have some cheeses there that I don’t have here.

Until next time go and make some cheese.

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4 comments

  1. Thank you, it was born of necessity, my wife wanted me to find a way to collect the whey easier. I will have some pictures up on the Facebook page later this week, including some close ups of the press.

    1. It is a great “starter” cheese for aged cheeses. It can be ready in as little as 3 weeks. I prefer it to age at least a month or two, but this one only has a month.

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